PORTo, PORTugal – it’s all about Port

I don’t know about you, but I’m a big fan of port wine – for me, it brings back memories of UK Christmases, family, warmth and cosiness. So this week, we’re going back to its origins and taking a look at where it’s from.

If you haven’t tried port before, there are both red and white varieties – made in the same way, just with different coloured grapes. Red ports are typically served as dessert wines, whereas white and tawny ports are often aperitifs.

Different varieties of port. Photo by liljc716 under Creative Commons Licence

Different varieties of port. Photo by liljc716 under Creative Commons Licence

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King’s Day in the Netherlands

Us Dutch have a reputation for being a lively bunch and this becomes really obvious when we celebrate King’s Day in the Netherlands. It’s a day when  everyone parties in the streets, dressed in orange in honour of our king’s birthday.

King's day the netherlands

Photo by Alex E. Proimos under Creative Commons Licence

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Earth Month: doing your bit as a traveller

April 2015 is the 45th anniversary of Earth Month, which raises awareness of the environmental issues our planet is facing. And it got me thinking about the different ways we each of us can do our bit, particularly when it comes to planning and jetting off on our holidays.

Travel is always going to have an impact on the environment, no matter how mindful we are when we visit a destination. But there are a few things we can put into action to reduce our carbon footprint.

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A taste of South America – local specialities

South America may be a vast, varied land of contrasting countries, each with its own culinary local specialities but nearly all natives will agree that mealtimes should be a sociable affair shared with friends and family. So in this region, you’ll find dishes made with lots of care and attention.

In recent years, there has been a global rise in popularity for South American food, so you may already be familiar with a number of popular dishes.

Most speciality dishes across South America include empanadas – or pastel in Portuguese – a stuffed bread or pastry which can have a sweet or savoury filling. The region is also known for its many popular condiments such as salsa, chimichurri, and chipotle, a smoked chili sauce.

empanada

Photo by James under Creative Common Licence

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Eco-Tourism in Costa Rica

When you think of eco-tourism, Costa Rica is usually the country that springs to mind. With its many national parks and protected areas, Costa Rica is a very popular destination for travellers who like their holidays to be environmentally friendly.

Guanacaste National Park

This national park which is located in the north of Costa Rica was created to make a corridor so animals could easily migrate from the rain forest to the dry forest. This park, which is a conservation area and a UNESCO World Heritage Site is home to over 10,000 species of animals ranging from birds, mammals to insects.

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5 not-to-be-missed events happening in 2015

If you’re planning to travel this year, there are some pretty monumental events taking place around the world – and you can experience all of them with us.

100th anniversary of the Gallipoli Campaign

2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the WWI Gallipoli landings. Thousands of Australians and New Zealanders lost their lives while storming its shores on 25th April 1915, expecting to join British forces on the Western Front.

Today, a large proportion of Aussies and Kiwis head to the Gallipoli peninsula each year, to pay their respects to fellow countrymen who lost their lives during the campaign. Residents of Australia and New Zealand can join one of our two commemorative ANZAC Day trips, departing mid-April.

ANZAC Cove, Gallipoli, Turkey

ANZAC Cove, Gallipoli, Turkey

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Why You Should Visit Egypt in 2015

This post is written by Trafalgar Travel Director Dean Smart. Read more of his travel adventures on his personal blog The Smart Way Round which he writes with his wife Natalie.

The Muezzin’s rhythmic call to prayer split the still morning air. It was still dark as I left the hotel, but the first rays of light were breaking to the east. The scent of apple tea was beginning to waft from homes and cafes. Almost like ghosts, the white clad faithful shuffled down the street towards the local mosque as the city started to awaken.

Cairo

Photo by Andrew A. Shenouda under Creative Common Licence

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